Strengthening Leadership Grit

As a consultant and coach, I can attest that leadership personality and style are the most crucial factors in organizational strength. Today―and especially for the future―we need leaders who can engage the workforce, manage people, and inspire collaboration and innovation. Leadership personality is critical.

The spectrum of human personality is extremely complex, with experts debating its intricacies and nuances. In Personality at Work: The Drivers and Derailers of Leadership (McGraw-Hill Education, 2017), Dr. Warren cites five behavioral traits which leaders exhibit along a spectrum. He has also identified four key personality dimensions that affect organizational success:

  1. Teamwork/Social intelligence
  2. Deference
  3. Dominance
  4. Task mastery/Grit

Of the four key personality dimensions, leaders with true grit have the greatest success in engaging people.

How Strong is Your Grit?

Leaders with grit focus on execution and achievement, promoting and upholding high standards. They have a strong drive to succeed, are group-focused and pride themselves on being strongly motivational.

Personal initiative, ambition and a desire to make a difference characterize these leaders, who love to solve problems and set worthy team goals. Their people are drawn to their strength, determination and confidence.

Leaders with grit are extremely conscientious and disciplined, keenly aware of what’s best, what’s right and why. These organized and detail-oriented leaders understand the consequences of their actions and strive to provide the best outcomes for their people and organizations.

Curiosity motivates them to enjoy learning, thinking and creating, so it’s no surprise they’re born innovators who attract like-minded people. They can, however, get carried away with excitement and lose track of their leadership responsibilities. Surrounding themselves with administrative thinkers can help them avoid this trap.

Those who lack grit can work with colleagues, mentors or professional coaches to increase initiative, focus on achievement, work on planning and goal-setting, and create a vision worth pursuing. As these new skills become habits, very little prompting will be necessary. Their newfound desire for achievement will be contagious.

What do you think? How much grit do you have? You can call me at 704-827-4474; let’s talk. And as always, I can be reached here, or on LinkedIn.

This entry was posted in career, learning, relationships, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>